On Romantic Literature

By the time Mary Shelley published Frankenstein in 1818—it could be argued her Modern Prometheus was the quintessence of Romantic literature—it would seem the Romantic era was already approaching its zenith. Just 20 years earlier Wordsworth and Coleridge had published their Lyrical Ballads, believed by most to be the “the premiere volume of English Romanticism,”... Continue Reading →

Untethered τέχνη

  The polls tell us that we as a collective whole are becoming less religious and less concerned about sacred and holy things, at least in the Western world. At the same time we are becoming more and more entranced with science and technology, what the ancient Greeks called τέχνη (Techne). Most people walk around... Continue Reading →

On Speaking Well

In recent years, speaking well has become an educational ideal for graduates at many institutions. Able speakers can convey their thoughts and intents with both ease and confidence. Isocrates, the pre-socratic rhetorician, terms it “assurance.” Unfortunately, courses in rhetoric and speech aren’t always required, and a number of graduates would find it difficult to present, let... Continue Reading →

Groping For God: How the Greeks Anticipated the Coming of Christ

  In the gospel of John, we read about some Greeks who come to Philip and ask to see Jesus. Rumors and news about Christ have been circulating and these men are longing to make his acquaintance. The text says: “Now among those who went up to worship at the feast were some Greeks. So... Continue Reading →

Dante’s Dalliance with the History of Language

  As a scholar and writer, Dante Alighieri intentionally published a number of works in everyday Italian. Though this was most unusual for medieval writers who favored Latin, he felt this commonality of language would broaden his audience and perhaps strengthen the superiority of the Italian language. He may have had an ulterior motive, but... Continue Reading →

What is Meaningful Art?

The philosopher and theologian, Francis Schaeffer, once said, Unlike modern man, the men of the day did not live in a splintered world. Art was an intimate part of life. What is represented had more than an aesthetic value divorced from considerations of truth and religious significance. Schaeffer reminds us that art reflects a particular... Continue Reading →

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